Monday, August 1, 2016

Glenda Propst reviews the book "All the Time in the World" by Caroline Angell

A few weeks ago I was asked if I would do a book review on a book called
“All the Time in the World” by Caroline Angell
I have never done a book review before but the book looked interesting so I said yes.
It took me a little less than a week to read the book but partially because I have been spending a lot of time with my mom who just moved into a skilled care facility so I don’t have a lot of time to read.

Sometimes when I am reading a book, if it doesn’t grab me from the beginning, I have a hard time making a commitment. I didn’t have a problem with that. It didn’t take me long to really connect with the main character Charlotte who was caring for two little boys named Matthew and George. It was obvious from the start that this writer truly understood the dynamics of a nanny’s role in the family. Only someone with this kind of insight could narrate the scene where the children are picked up and dropped off at pre-school and describe the scenario of the interaction between the stay at home mommies, the cardboard cut-out moms, the moms who treat the caregivers with little respect and the mix of nannies and au pairs. It’s a scene that plays out on a daily basis in pre-schools everywhere.
I know that Charlotte was a nanny who I could have been friends with. We could have been on a Facebook group for nannies together and we would have made a connection because she really understood the ins and outs of working with a family. She projected a professional image and understood her role within the family. She understood that working with a family requires a lot of give and take and that sometimes you have to do things that were not in your job description just because circumstances warrant it.
The reason this is so important is that this book is all about the relationship a nanny has with her employers, the interaction with the mom and the bond that can develop between a mom and a nanny and how a nanny’s role can change within the family with time and circumstances.
When I started reading this book, I had a sinking feeling in my stomach that I knew how it was going to end but I was wrong and this book did not disappoint.
This is a book that will definitely appeal to nannies but I think it can appeal to a wider audience because it is a great storyline and Charlotte is a character that you will identify with and root for all the way to the end.
As I tried to write this review, I struggled a little with remembering that this is a not a nanny training manual that teaches the dos and don’ts of being a good nanny, it is a story that will touch the heart of any nanny or parent with a nanny.
I can always tell that I have read a great book when days after the last page has been read, my mind wanders back to the story and I find myself thinking…

” I wonder what Charlotte is doing now?”

There is really only one negative thing I have to say about this book, and I say it mostly because anyone who knows me, would know that I wouldn’t let it go without saying something.
Charlotte is truly a nanny in every sense of the word. She is educated, experienced, smart, and understands the dynamics of doing her job and doing it well. All through the book she refers to herself as a babysitter. I don’t think that calling herself a nanny would have made any kind of difference in the storyline but I think the things she did were over and above the call of duty for “just a babysitter”

This is a really good book. I am certain you will like it, and identify with so many things in it and I hope you will read it! I can’t really get into the nitty gritty of why I connected so much with this book without giving away the storyline but once you read it I think you will understand that this book covers a wide range of issues and emotions unique to those of us who love and care for other people’s children. I hope other people who read it will have new insight into the important work we all do….no matter what we consider our job title to be.

I will be giving away a copy of the book on my Facebook page but if you are not on Facebook, you can email me at nannytransitions(at)gmail(dot)com and I will gladly put your name into the drawing for the book.

Monday, June 13, 2016

A very special post from Jan St. Clair

The following post was written by a woman who is a gift to the nanny community.
She also adds her final thoughts as her job that she talks about in her final note comes to an end after 11 years.

Jan St Clair ,thank you for sharing your words so eloquently.

Article I wrote in 1997, about how I learned to weather the loss of "my kids" at the end of my nanny jobs. I now face the end of the new job I mentioned in final note following the article. :
When I began my first nanny job, I was confident that I could maintain a professional distance from the children and spare us all pain from the inevitable separation at the end of the job, and I had a plan. I set out to divert the children’s attention and affection from me and toward their parents, by always commenting about how much mommy & daddy love them, and how proud mommy & daddy will be when they see this new accomplishment, etc. Of course, I couldn’t stop my own growing affection and pride from showing as I told them these things. I never let myself say “I love you,” I always said I’m so lucky Mommy and Daddy picked me to come and take care of you. I like you SO much!” (Well, I excused myself, I couldn’t be a cold fish...I HAD to tell them I liked and appreciated them....)
As a live-out nanny I went to my own home at the end of each day, so it was easy to convince the children that I am not part of the family. I showed them pictures of my own family and casually talked about my home life. As their verbal skills grew, they began questioning how mommy and daddy could love them better than anything and yet leave them every day to go to work. Once they had grasped the reassurance that their loving parents regretfully leave them in order to go earn money to buy the family food, clothing, etc., I started showing them my paycheck. I explained that caring for them is my job, and that mommy and daddy give me money for it so I can buy my food and clothes and pay rent for my home. I made it clear that I liked this arrangement and enjoyed my job because I liked children in general and them in particular. I always tried to present an honest picture of myself as a benevolent outsider, though I was more and more aware that the children depended on my consistent presence and support through 50 hours per week of their waking lives, and that we meshed together during the day like parts of a well-tuned, well-oiled machine.
After two years, the mother decided to put the children in Daycare near her job so she could see them more often. During those years, the children and I had inevitably become what non-caregivers refer to as “attached”, despite my continual efforts to spare us. This “attachment” is the emotional equivalent of plants that have grown up together with the roots now so tangled and intertwined that there can be no separation without loss of a major part of each delicate root structure and trauma to each plant. As I was faced with losing “my children”, I was shocked by the intensity of my feelings.
The mother and I planned the transition together and carefully prepared the children for the change, and since I live in the area and was welcome in the home, I could truthfully promise to visit and keep in touch. At last I told them quite openly of my love for them, and emphasized (with their mother) that my moving on was for grownup reasons that had nothing to do with them, and that I would miss being with them every day.
I still had no idea how much I would miss them. But I threw myself into easing them through the impending separation with visits to the (sensitive and like-minded) new family I’d be working for, checking off days on a handmade countdown calendar, planning our last special day together, reading library books on Daycare (there ís NOTHING about nannies leaving, and there should be), going to our special haunts one last time, sharing my feelings and inviting theirs (and accepting theirs even when they weren’t expressed the way I anticipated) and talking about life changes in general when growing people move on from one thing to another (school, job, marriage) and how very many feelings everyone can feel at such times .
Regardless of all my efforts, it was an agonizing separation all around. I had come to expect the separation to hurt me, but I had no idea how much or for how long. Initially I felt constant and excruciating emotional pain, cried myself to sleep a lot, and agonized over the rough adjustment the children were reportedly having. We waited a couple of weeks before getting together, but during early visits, the children would cling to me and ask me to come back. I was careful to support both their feelings and the party line that the parents and I had established. I’d lament aloud that I wished there were two of me: one to take care of the children I cared for now, and one to take care of them...and that I wished there were two of them, so that they could have fun at their new “school” and still be home with me. (I wanted to point out that we all genuinely missed each other, but had all moved on to new lives.) For a full year, each time I would leave their home after a joyous visit grief would grip my heart with a physical ache. Toward the end of the year the ache gradually eased, and finally I could simply enjoy our time together then contentedly return to my own life. I got together with the family frequently at first, then gradually spaced out the visits so that now (4 years later) I see them every few months and send handmade cards for every holiday and milestone. It is a great joy to me to watch them continue to grow and develop, and they make it clear that I hold a special place in their hearts as well. The parents are delighted with the enhancement to their children’s emotional support system--former nannies make wonderful extended-family members in a day and age when loved and trusted adults for children to look to are far and few between.
Now, I am at my third job, and after 8 months there I am still somewhat achy over the loss of the twins from my second job (I took care of them for over three years using the same approach, but with adjusted expectations and a little modification. I didn’t delay expressing my own love with these children or with my current one, even though I’ve continued to stress family love over my own.). I still see each of my former charges often, and sometimes get the moms and kids from the first 2 families together in the playground for a group visit: the kids ask for each other when I visit the individual families. The loss was easier the second time, partly because I was prepared, and partly because the children had an easier adjustment-- which eliminated mother-hen-type worry and irrational guilt from my part of the mix.
I think that even though my careful and forthright approach was not the panacea I had expected, it did help the children. It laid a foundation for each of them to have their own developmental-level ability to accept and understand losing me as a caregiver and retaining me as the lifelong (if largely absentee) friend I expect to be. It said to them that they can count on the people who care about them to do their best to tell them what they need to know. It may have kept them from having to fear who else might drop out of their lives without warning.
I have come to the conclusion that every nanny job will involve both joy and grief--probably of equal intensity. No matter how much we may wish to shield ourselves and our charges from the powerful painful emotions, to deny or suppress them makes our lives even more difficult and does not allow us to reach the other side of grief and move on. All that can make those feelings bearable is to face them honestly and to support each other through them. How we prepare ourselves and the children for the separation will not ease the grief, but it will demonstrate our confidence that it can be survived and resolved with trust and love intact. It is one of the valuable life lessons we are in a position to pass on to our charges.
Dealing with the other emotional sandbagging during the course of the job (such as
ourselves and our full-hearted contributions becoming invisible to the children when they see us and their parents watching them in an audience) is the warm-up for the final event, as I see it. You call on your network of fellow-nannies or family members or friends who will listen and care, and you vent your feelings. You get through them together. You build your network of people to call on, and who can then call on you. You test the fiber of your safety net, and build a solid base of support.
I do recognize that it is not always possible for nannies to visit often (or even once) after the job ends, but keeping in contact via mail and the occasional phone call can communicate to the children that you continue to care, and any responses will provide you with some welcome continuity as well. (You might try enclosing a self-addressed, stamped envelope to encourage a return letter.)
12/21/04 notes: This article was written in 1997, and the children I first cared for are now teenagers. We stay in touch as much as their schedules and mine permit, and visit at least around Christmastime. I’ve managed to keep in touch with all “my kids who live with their parents” throughout the years, to the enrichment of all our lives.
Now I am facing the natural end of my 4th job, as after 6 years with the family the youngest interviews for full time school starting in September 05. I found out just yesterday that beginning Sept. 1, 2005, rather than the 25-30 hours a week I had projected, with another part time job in the mornings to make up the loss of the 42 hours I currently work, their childcare needs are expected to drop to less than 10 hours/week. I may be able to keep those few hours with them, but the daily relationship with this family will end, and I will need to get another primary job in September. I may not even manage to find a job allowing me to keep weekly hours with them at all. I grieve.
I do not fear for the children’s safety or wellbeing, as they have excellent parents and the teachers in their school are exceptional. I’m glad not to have that concern added to the mix of emotions I’m dealing with. I am lucky and unlucky to know so far in advance, I can prepare in plenty of time to find the best possible new job, and I will have a prolonged ache of anticipated loss in my heart until the actual separation.
Does the end of a job ever get easier? I don’t think so. It can become less complicated by additional concerns (like worry that I’ll ever stop hurting, I’ve experienced this before… or that I’ll ever get another job, I have excellent references and experience). But hurting when the job ends is another hazard of the profession, and to me it ís worth the benefits I reap by working in this career. I have another set of honorary extended family members, and a bond with 2 more kids that will stretch but not snap as we see each other less often. I have nanny friends who understand my loss, and offer support. And I am in a profession that offers children’s love and trust in exchange for dedicated care. It is wonderful food for the soul. I will heal in time. I will heal.
Janice St.Clair
4/27/05 notes
The children I spoke of in this article did not go to daycare. Even when they were in the playgroups I’d organized, I was right there with them. I’m coming to realize that with children who have a broad base of adult caregivers/teachers, that the loss of our daily contact may not be as traumatic for the children as for me…they will experience a change, but they are already used to being with other adults and are entwined with them. They will just be with them for longer hours, and I will be there much less often. Perhaps the younger child, who will be starting a new school with new teachers, will have a harder adjustment than his sister, and will need extra support.
The mom in my current job does not want to refer at all to my “last day” and create an unnatural sense of loss for the children. They already lost a great-grandmother to death, and she doesn’t want the association of that pain and permanent separation in their minds. She wants to let my last day pass without remarking, have the schedule change to accommodate school, and have planned visits with me for the first few weeks marked on the calendar, so the if the kids ask for me (IF!) they can be told when they will see me again and assured that I am still a part of their lives. Of course I urged her to call me with milestones so I could congratulate them immediately via phone, and to invite me to school plays and such.
It’s harder on me to face the end of this job without sharing the loss with the children. I am excited about my upcoming job, and since it is with children of much the same ages, there is potential for getting everyone together for playdates as I did with other former charges.
I am not sure that my boss’s current plan is the best one, but my own feelings are clouding my thoughts at present. Whatever my feelings, the children’s needs come first. I have many ways to process my own grief…I will do whatever the mom and I can work out as being best for the children.

Monday, February 1, 2016

Touched by a Nanny: Nancy Kanouff

Touched by a Nanny named Nancy Kanouff

Submitted by Cheri Brown

I believe things happen for a reason. I bought something off a yard sale site that Nancy had posted , we were meant to meet. 

I had just left my nanny job of 4 years . It was a very stressful time. I had really only known a small handful of nannies and most of them were much younger than me. I can't even remember how the conversation came about but there we were both nannies and around the same age. 
She told me about her " Network" of close to 100 nannies(and growing) and asked me to join her Facebook group. 
What I didn't know was how many times I would lean on Nancy for support over the past couple years.  
Being a veteran nanny of 24 years I never knew what it could do to your day, your week, your job to have such an amazing support system. Thank you Nancy for your hard work, untold hours and dedication that you give the nanny community on a daily basis. You have truly made a difference in my life and the lives of many others.

Monday, October 12, 2015

Touched by a Nanny named Becky Kavanagh

Submitted by Karen Yatsko

One of the very first nannies I ever met was Becky Kavanagh and I was very lucky! She took me under her lovely feathered wing and kept an eye on me my very first nanny conference.  I will never forget her compassion, laughter and friendliness to a newcomer.  Since then our friendship has been a constant source of fun!  You cannot mention Becky’s name and not think of the word fun!  Attending one of her presentations at an INA Conference, I have the fondest memory of her asking everyone to remove their shoes and have fun!!  I was always sitting in the front row whenever Becky presented something as you might be singing and dancing barefoot.

One year I had the pleasure of going to visit Becky on her home turf and stay at her employer’s house.  I fondly remember meeting some of the children and got to peer inside Becky’s world as a nanny.  She really is a smooth and constant beacon of love - from the ups and downs of helping raise many children through her employers divorce, Becky had my admiration.  I never once heard Becky complain or have a bad day - her positivity had such an impact on me!  To this day, I try to always be positive because of her!! 

I also had many INA adventures with Becky!  We traveled to the NAEYC one year in Toronto to give a presentation on “Nannies as a Career Choice” representing the INA.  One Conference, Becky brought her sister and she fit right in with the nanny crowd!   Becky and I were both were nominated for Parent’s Magazine Caregiver of the Year Award, which Becky won!!  We both have served on the Board of the INA, and I remember Becky’s calm demeanor at many discussions and her personable tact with people.

We may be old friends, but I will never be tired of her smile and genuine love for nannies!

Monday, October 5, 2015

Taking Inventory During Times of Transition

I would like to thank Michelle LaRowe for contributing this helpful article.
It is great advice on preparing yourself for the next step going forward.

Taking Inventory During Times of Transition
by Michelle LaRowe

Whether your nanny job has a hard end date or you sense that the end of your position is coming near, you’re heading for a time of transition. But before you take the next step in your nanny journey, stop to take inventory so that you don’t forget to look forward as you’re focusing on your soon to be past.
Are You Ready to Move On?
If you’ve been in the same job for a number of years, chances are you have a strong emotional commitment and sense of loyalty to the family you’ve worked for. You may feel a variety of strong, conflicting emotions about the job ending and may be emotionally and physically drained if the job was particularly intense. Oftentimes nannies are more concerned with the well-being of the family than of themselves and as a result will put the families’ needs first when it comes to navigating their departure.  It’s no wonder that once a nanny job has finally ended, nannies often walkway feel completely exhausted and burned out.
Before committing to your next position, it’s essential that you access your readiness. Ask yourself if you’re ready to give your physical and emotional best to your next family. If you’re not, take some time for you. Picking up temporary and short-term assignments can be a great way to ensure you get an emotional break while still bringing in an income.  Doing so can also serve as career insurance,  ensuring that you keep your reputation and references intact - as it can be quite common for a nanny coming out of a long-term position to go through a string of jobs, some which may end badly,  before finding her next right match. 
Are Your Expectations Realistic?
If you’ve been off the job market for a while, you want to get in touch with current nanny industry trends and industry standards in the area you are looking to work.  The wages and benefits package you had at your last position don’t necessarily transfer to your next one. The way you communicated with your past employer won’t necessarily translate to your new one.  While you may approach the job and your new employers the same, the way they interpret you and your approach may be quite different.
When starting your new job search consider what is negotiable to you and what isn’t. Know what your bottom line is when it comes to pay and benefits and consider carefully what duties and responsibilities you are willing to take on. Be prepared to justify why you are worth your required wages and why you will be picky about the job you accept, rather than expecting to have the perfect job at the perfect pay handed to you on a silver platter. Remember, the agency or parents you are working with won’t know your job expectations unless you tell them. If you don’t sell yourself to them during your search, they won’t know what they have the opportunity to buy. 

Are You Easy to Work With?
After the first few nanny jobs, most nannies know what types of families they work best with and what types of jobs they are best suited for. Because they’ve been through a job search before and have high expectations for their next position, if not careful, their confidence can be portrayed as arrogance.  Consider when you go to a new doctor for an exam. The doctor has done hundreds of exams on new patients, but for you, this is your first experience with this doctor. How would it make you feel if the doctor rushed through the exam with an all business approach, expected you to take his word on everything without evidence, and showed no care as to how you perceived the examination process to go. Be careful not to be perceived as that doctor. Even when an agency representative knows you personally from nanny organizations or networking, she still needs to put you through their process to ensure you the highest level of representation.  Nannies who expect exceptions make it incredibly difficult for placement specialists to represent them successfully. And for many parents hiring a nanny, it’s their first time interfacing with potential nannies.  A nanny who comes across as arrogant or entitled will be a huge turnoff.
As you prepare for your job search, put yourself in the shoes of parents and nanny placement specialists. Consider how your attitude may be portrayed by them. Ask yourself if you’re prepared to consider the needs of parents and agency representatives as they put you through the screening process. Are you giving off the impression you think you are?

Transitions can be hard, but you can set yourself up for success in your next position by taking inventory of your readiness. Once you are truly ready to commit to your job search and next job, that is when you will have the greatest success.

Michelle LaRowe is the 2004 INA Nanny of the Year and executive director of Morningside Nannies, a Houston, TX based award- winning nanny placement agency.

Monday, August 31, 2015

Touched by a Nanny named Gael Ann Dow

Touched By a Nanny: The Wonderful Gael Ann Dow
Submitted by Becky Kavanagh

When Glenda first started this series I was eager to write about the wonderful Gael Ann Dow. For some reason I was having a hard time coming up with the right words to describe the person who is Gael Ann. Her unassuming nature belies the many facets hid within. She’s certainly a kindred spirit when it comes to her philosophy around children – providing rich activities and experiences while allowing them to discover and learn at their own pace. She’s absolutely brilliant with children. It’s just a fact.

Naturally creative with an artistic flare, Gael Ann brings so much to the children in her care. To those who know her she is warm, caring and tender-hearted. While she doesn’t seek attention, she’s happy to volunteer to serve or help when asked.  

Her quiet, self-contained demeanor may be the reason that Gael Ann is a great listener.  I’ve never known her to offer advice unless requested to do so. When she shares, listen carefully because it will be filled with wisdom that comes from an innate understanding of children, families and years of experience. She is the consummate professional nanny who goes above and beyond – a true model for others.

I have been fortunate to know Gael Ann for many years and keep learning new things about her all the time. What a wonderful nanny, mentor and friend!

Monday, August 24, 2015

Touched by a Nanny named Deirdre Bellows

Touched by a Nanny named Deirdre
Submitted by Glenda Propst
I have been in the nanny industry for many years. When I was younger I never felt out of place or uncomfortable at any conference I attended.
As my charges grew into young adults, I was always happy to share photos of them with my nanny friends as we sat around catching up and chatting. When they were young, everyone thought that they were adorable (because aren’t all babies adorable?) but as my charges grew up there were times when people simply did not know what to say to me, or how to respond.
It usually made me feel a little awkward.
As one of the older nannies when you spend as many years with a family as I have, you lose a lot of the common ground with younger nannies. It isn’t that they are mean or rude, it’s just different.
A few years ago, I was a conference and I was feeling very “out of place”
I had been in the hotel lobby and I had decided to walk up to my room and just order room service and nap, when someone walked up to me, was so happy to see me, and asked if I had lunch yet?
I said “No” she said “Would you like to have lunch with me?”
This was someone I knew but not someone I knew well. We walked across the street and had a wonderful lunch, laughing and talking and discovering how much we had in common.
At the end of lunch, when it was time to pay the bill, she said “I would like to treat you”
It was the highlight of my trip and it was also the beginning of a wonderful long distance friendship.

I was touched by a nanny named Deirdre Bellows . I know she didn’t know how much her gesture or reaching out meant to me, but it meant so much and I thought she should know.